Monthly Archives: January 2018

A Psychological Root of Multiculturalism

“As within, so without.”

Introduction

There’s a crisis of multiculturalism sweeping the West, with those historically white nations which are most susceptible to pathological altruism are falling the hardest. Nothing less momentous than the fate of Western Civilization itself hangs in the balance, as certain political forces farm votes by opening the floodgates of third-world immigration, trading the great cultural traditions built over the course of several centuries for the hedonistic self-righteousness that’s inevitably incentivized by the marriage between democracy and pathological altruism. While a precious minority in Western governance try to hold back the tide, those politicians pandering to a populace drunk on self-destructive virtue-signaling continue to intensify the deluge of so-called “refugees”, which are given the alms of the Welfare State in exchange for their precious votes. It’s a co-dependent relationship played out on a massive scale, between the political actors of the Welfare State and the foreigners interested not in assimilating into a new culture but in grabbing free stuff; but why do the descendants of the great peoples who built these nations cheer as the political reigns are handed over to people with fundamentally different beliefs, values, and traditions?

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A Reason for English’s Orthographical Complexity

(Note: This is an edited version of a comment I originally put on Reddit.)

The greater the degree of orthographical depth in a language, the higher the degree of separation there exists in one’s memories of the spoken vs. written forms, which provides the raw materials for the creation of a cognitive system I refer to as a segregated association structure. The human ability to have different modes for use in different spheres of life (e.g., how you act in formal situations vs. casual situations) doesn’t originate through magic; one must actually form separate networks of association in one’s mind, since the mental processes which constitute thinking and action operate in terms of cascades of perceptions which are organized along lines of association. With a shallow orthography—a writing system where there’s a plain correspondence approaching the supposed ideal of one-grapheme-for-one-phoneme—any mode of acting or thinking that one maps onto one’s network of associations making up one’s knowledge of the written language will bleed into those modes of acting or thinking which are organized by associations with spoken words; and vice versa.

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In Defense of English Spelling

(Note: Below is an edited version of a comment I originally put on Reddit.)

Many people have claimed that English orthography is unnecessarily complex, with many different graphemes or graphemic sequences representing the same phoneme (e.g., fact and phone), many different phonemes being represented by the same grapheme or graphemic sequence (for example book vs. tool), and many letters being added seemingly arbitrarily (for instance salmon and debt). Even if it would be difficult to completely reform English spelling, wouldn’t it be easy to make the system radically easier to learn? We could change “choir” to “quire”, “colonel” to “curnel”, and so forth. While learners of languages like Spanish breeze through the process of learning how to spell, those unlucky enough to be trying to acquire the behemoth that is the English spelling system must spend years before they acquire reasonable competence at spelling. What’s the point of retaining a system that’s hard to master, when languages like Spanish work just fine?

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The Limitations of Pure Immersion

(Note: This is an edited version of a comment I originally posted on Reddit.)

I’d say that the foundation of my research into how to learn a foreign language to a high standard is to take note of how children acquire their native language(s), and then attempt not to copy exactly how they do so but to apply the same underlying principles. Adults are different than children, but not in a way that makes it neurologically impossible to acquire natural language with a categorically identical outcome; we as adults must implement the same subconscious methods children implement, but through manual choice rather than natural propensity. It’s a delicate balancing act, for it’s a matter of conscious implementation of the conditions which lead to subconscious language-acquisition.

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How to Soak Up Language Like a Sponge

Many people believe that there are inexorable neurological changes which occur during the transition from childhood to adulthood which making learning natural languages fundamentally more difficult for adults. Such people believe that children pick up languages smoothly, naturally, and with no conscious effort, while adults necessarily run into obstacles, where certainly a high level of proficiency is possible for those who are dedicated, but where a truly native grasp of the language is physically impossible, due to our biological programming.

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Jordan Peterson: His Recent Retreat from the Fire

(Note: This is an edited version of a comment I originally posted on Reddit.)

I feel like Peterson’s recent shift away from fighting against the destruction of genuine conversation through the plague of PC culture, and toward doing damage control for his mainstream reputation in the form of a flood of tweets disavowing the alt right, has correlated with the opening of a schism in the community that’s formed around Peterson, where two camps have come about: On one side we see the people who have always treated him like a Messiah, and as a result are now turning their attention to frenzied substance-devoid arguments against superficial understandings of alt-right ideology; and on the other side we see the individuals who have taken a liking to Peterson not as an authority figure but as an exceptional thinker, and thus are starting to wonder why Peterson has transitioned to a mode of behavior that looks awfully similar to any other run-of-the-mill attempt by an obedient public intellectual to avoid social backlash for wrongthink. Where he should ignore empty personal attacks, instead he wastes his limited time by constantly refreshing Twitter to see who’s calling him a “neo-Nazi” or an “alt-right sympathizer”.

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